“Living Room” is live at Wyoming Public Media

portrait
Photo by the wonderful Ash Ngu

Woohoo!

Way back when I recorded an essay for the radio. Remember that? It’s since been produced and published. Grab it on iTunes or on Wyoming Public Media.

Oh my! I’ve been waiting for this since February of 2016. When I received the email this morning that it had been completed I almost didn’t open it for fear of hearing my own voice. Of course, that’s silly. I’m so glad I did. So much has changed since I sent a query from chilly London to windswept Wyoming to see if they’d have me on the Wyoming Public Media Spoken Words program. When I went in to record an essay about her, my grandma was still living in her own house at the age of 90. Since then we’ve helped her move into assisted living. When I first went in to record, I was just launching a journey to independently discover who I was as a creative media maker. Since then, I’ve learned much more about that part of myself and feel confident in it. Of course, both of these situations will continue to evolve, not unlike what I describe in this piece, and this podcast captures a perfect snapshot of where my family and I were at that very moment, one tile in a mosaic I’m piecing together.

Many thanks to the team at Wyoming Public Radio & Media​, especially production director Micah Schweizer for thoughtful conversation on third culture and mixed race experiences, and producer Annie Osburne for making sense of it and putting it all together. Thanks to GrubWriters​ and Jennifer Mattson​ for initially giving me an outlet to play with essay, including this one. Thanks to Gakko​ for the media-making and identity formation love. Thanks to CSU APACC​ for the community and Silk Knots support. Thanks to the East Bay Donut Club for the community and nudge to keep writing — this story and others.

P.S. Still building out the Silk Knots archive. Record or write something here.

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Homecoming

She said our meeting was 命運, fate. And I believed her. Words from the young woman I met at the airport, in transit from one country to another. I had been on the road now for more than six months. I had started to yearn for home. Where was home, any way? She reminded me it was with good people. Continue reading “Homecoming”

How do I do an oral history?

Recently I’ve had the enormous joy of spending time with people I love, connecting and/or reconnecting.

I’ve logged hours of oral histories in the process. In some ways it comes naturally to me as a journalist, but in others it feels very foreign to do so with people so intimate to me, so I’m always looking for ways to improve or adapt my process. It’s never perfect. No two interviews go exactly the same way. I suppose the only common way to go is forward.

As I tell people what I’m up to a common response is, “I’ve always wanted to do that but wouldn’t know where to begin!”

If you find yourself saying this, here are some useful guidelines… Continue reading “How do I do an oral history?”

Reading on the Radio

I find several things especially life affirming. These include the butterfly rush from a somersault, when a curtain rises on a stage production, and when a story goes to press. Also when I get to the grocery store and find avocados or good chocolate on sale. Now I can add one more. Recording for radio! Continue reading “Reading on the Radio”

I Have Dual Ethnicity and Double Vision, Superman is Chinese, and Other Revelations

Dropping a note to say I’m alive. And, “Hi!”

The last few weeks I’ve been absent from the internet but present in the world, trekking from Colorado to Wyoming, Washington to Oregon. Except for when I was reading exceptional things. Here are a few… Continue reading “I Have Dual Ethnicity and Double Vision, Superman is Chinese, and Other Revelations”

Maui Friends of the Library Book Store

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Most of the books I intend to use for research are borrowed from libraries in either print or digital form, but bibliophile that I am I’ve acquired a few. I walked away with five new (old) books for a whopping $1.25. I love bookstores that aren’t overly fussy where you can rummage thrift-store style until you find exactly what you need (but didn’t know it).

Our dear friend Martha told us about the one pictured above. It’s one of three supported by volunteers for Maui Friends of the Library. It’s a place for both private individuals and public libraries to donate used books that are then sold to support local library programs.

“Not only does this keep books out of the landfill, but it provides a place where everyone on Maui can buy books for pocket change,” their website says. With prices generally ranging from free to $2, it’s true!

There might be such a program in your home community, too. Shout out to Poudre River Friends of the Library. I have been enjoying its library’s lovely sunlit desks as I chip away on my reading.

Sara Hayden