A Belated Fred Korematsu Day Message…

Jan. 30 marks Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution, the first American holiday to be named after an Asian American.

Fred Korematsu refused to be incarcerated following Executive Order 9066 which mandated that people with Japanese ancestry be forcibly relocated from their homes to remote camps in World War II when more than 120,000 innocent people were moved. Korematsu was arrested. His case was eventually taken to the Supreme Court, but it wasn’t until decades later that his name was cleared. Learn more about his story here.

Celebrated in just a handful of states, it’s not yet a national holiday, but the effort to make it so continues.

Here are a few suggestions on how to commemorate this day…

Check out Densho

With a collection of oral histories and an archive of online resources, Densho is an organization that’s dedicated to preserving the histories and stories of the Japanese American experience during WWII.

Teach about it locally

The Korematsu Foundation seeks to educate about the importance of the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans in WWII as well as the Korematsu v. United States case. To bring these lessons to your local classrooms, request a free kit from the Korematsu Institute.

Watch “Allegiance” on Broadway (through Feb. 14)

The show is beautiful. I don’t think there was a dry eye in the audience when I went to see “Allegiance.” With snappy swing numbers and powerful storytelling, it’s not to be missed. Lea Salonga is lovely, and if you’re a Trekkie, now is your chance to catch George Takei live. Get your tickets now – it closes Feb. 14. See more here.

 

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One thought on “A Belated Fred Korematsu Day Message…

  1. Hi Sara, I liked your note on the Fred story. Chinese have an interesting story in Costa Rica too. We heard a little bit about it during our Pre-Service Training. A woman who wrote a history about them talked to us. There are quite a few Chinese here, though, from what I’ve seen, they tend to be quite segregated; but that’s certainly a foreigner’s perspective. I hope your research is going well, Sara. Love reading about your discoveries!!! Chris

    Christine Gaebler Voluntaria Proyecto Desarrollo Juvenil Cuerpo de Paz, Costa Rica Tel: 8518-7117 Email: campgaebler@gmail.com

    On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 11:49 AM, Silk Knots wrote:

    > Sara Hayden posted: “Jan. 30 marks Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties > and the Constitution, the first American holiday to be named after an Asian > American. Fred Korematsu refused to be incarcerated following Executive > Order 9066 which mandated that people with Japanese an” >

    Like

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